Mar
26
Mar 28

Q2 Event University of Sydney

"Molecular and Machine: The Quantum Metaphysics of the Great War in the thought of Major-General J.F.C. Fuller and A.N. Whitehead," Centre for International Secuirty Studies, March 26-29, 2015

Feb
21
9:00 pm21:00

ISA, Saturday February 21, 2015

8:15 AM
10:00 AM

SA04: Presidential Theme Panel - What is Geopolitics?

Participants

4:00 PM
5:45 PM

SD60: War - What is it Good For?

Papers

The State of War: A Genealogy

I see dead people

Who is war good for? Reading strategic texts as civilisational projects

Thinking Like a Bomb: The Significance of Target Acquisition Strategies for the Future of Warfare

Post-Westphalian States of Violence and the “End of War”

Abstract and Keywords

War is ostensibly to be avoided because it involves killing. But, over time a complex set of frameworks that establish the basis of ‘just war’ has been produced. These doctrines putatively constrain what counts as appropriate justifications for engaging in warfare (jus ad bellum) and, if war breaks out, what is considered permissible conduct (jus in bello). The tenor of these developments suggests an opposition to war – or, that it is only acceptable in special circumstances. This panel reconsiders this approach, exploring how the same principles that attempt to constrain violence also provide it with moral legitimation. It asks and addresses two questions: 1) How has war become an indispensable ethical component of political life?, and, as a consequence, 2) How do practices of lethality become legitimate in world politics? Reconsidering how and why war has been facilitated, justified through the normative valuation of killing, this panel recasts just war doctrines, laying out how they regulate when and why war is morally appropriate. Focused on how legitimate wars are distinguished from illegitimate ones and the ethical implications of war-related practices and tools, this panel contributes new thinking about how and why war is given a permanent warrant in international practice.

 

Feb
20
9:00 pm21:00

ISA, Friday, February 20th

Friday, February 20

4:00 PM
5:45 PM

FD57: Making Bodies International

Participants

Abstract and Keywords

Building on the publication of "Making Things International" and the on-going project on embodiment in IR, this project takes a fresh look at how bodies and their constitutive elements are imbricated in the international field. Looking at bodies themselves and how they move and are influenced by international dynamics, the technology and international regime regarding the circulation of blood, the disposal of corpses, and the role of microbes, bringing insights from the affective and corporeal turn to IR.

Technology; Sociology; Affect; Biopolitics; Technology (New/Modern/Innovation)

Feb
18
9:00 pm21:00

ISA, Wednesday, February 18th

Wednesday, February 18

1:45 PM
3:30 PM

WC42: Turning Ploughshares into Swords: Weapons and Weaponizations

4:00 PM
5:45 PM

Chairs and Discussants

Papers

The Killing Feeling: Emotions and the Evolution of Weapons

Gunning for War: Small Arms as Desired and Destructive Things

Weaponising Geography: On the Global Striations of Military Targeting

Computational Counterinsurgency: Data-Coding the Population in the Vietnam War

What Do Weapons Want?

WD76: Making Things Move

Participants

Abstract and Keywords

Building on the publication "Making Things International," this panel looks at the intersection of new materialism and international relations theory by focusing on the material conditions that structure contemporary global circulation. Focusing on passports, containers, vehicles, currency, and drugs, this contributes to the conversation about how to use the insights of Science and Technology Studies, particularly Actor-Network Theory in IR

Apr
17
Apr 19

Western Political Science Association


Panel 13. 03 - ''Information'' in Cybernetics, Society, Biology
Date:     Not Assigned
Chair(s):     Glezos, Simon, sglezos1@gmail.com, University of Victoria
Paper(s):    Signals in the Noise?: Hashtags and Memes on Twitter
Brennan, Katie, kpjb@hawaii.edu, University of Hawai''i at Manoa
Defensive Postures: The embodied spatiality of information technologies
Glezos, Simon, sglezos1@gmail.com, University of Victoria
Keyword Culture: Transforming Words into Information and the Technical Control of Language
Troumbley, Rex, rexlt@hawaii.edu, University of Hawaii
Incorporating Information: Nietzsche and Foucault on Embodied Responses to the Climate Change Event 
Anfison, Kellan, kanfi2040@gmail.com, Johns Hopkins University
Discussant(s):     Grove, Jairus, jairusg@hawaii.edu, University of Hawaii

Apr
17
Apr 19

Western Political Science Association

Chair(s):Ignatov, Anatoli, anatoli@jhu.edu, Johns Hopkins University

Paper(s):Aesthetic Responses to Synthetic Biology: The Ethics of Governing Evolution
Yee, Aubrey, aubreyy@hawaii.edu, University of Hawai'i
Ecology as a ‘Political’ Science:  The Struggles Between Subversion and Subservience
Luke, Timothy, twluke@vt.edu, Virginia Tech
Between Parsimony and Everything Else: Three Images of Ecological Thinking in Bateson, McNeil, and Lasswell
Grove, Jairus, jairusg@hawaii.edu, University of Hawaii
Getting a Feel for Life: The Subversive Science as an Ethical Science
Greear, Jake, jgreear1@jhu.edu, Johns Hopkins University

Discussant(s):Brault, Claire, cbrault@polsci.umass.edu, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Mar
29
6:30 am06:30

International Studies Association

Chairs and Discussants

Papers

Infectious Ideas and Geopolitical Hygiene: (Re)Coding the Colonial in E-Meme's Epidemiological Modeling

Militarization 2.0: A gender(ed) methodology on militarized corporations and their social media presence

Space, Control, and Governmentality in the Digital City

Security and the Internet of Things: A sensory adventure in the phenomenal world of drones, surveillance cameras, cell phones, and door fobs.

Google Cosmopolitanism: The Banality of Fascism and a Randy Economy

Abstract and Keywords

The distinction between cyberwar and physical combat is degrading as new technologies from social networking to thinking machines enter the fray of battle. This panel attempts to chart the new spaces and places where digital worlds and the physical world interface to create a geopolitical landscape both familiar and novel. Enemies, threats, targets, persons of concern, and riots abound but the locales and operating systems targeted and monitored frequently modulate between bodies, bank accounts, facebook pages, suburban neighborhoods, international borders, physical internet hubs, packed city centers, DNS Servers, tanks, and youtube comments sections. Each of the papers attempts to make sense conceptually of these new spaces and places as they are always hybrid; part digital, part physical. The papers each center on a particular facet of this hybridity: the digital city, militarized social networks, instability prediction software, artificial intelligence, and sensory drones. The panel seeks to make a contribution to this emerging area of empirical research in ways that take seriously the core questions of International and Global studies but within the complex technical and material ecology in which these questions unfold.

Critical Security Studies; Geopolitics; Globalization; Cyberterrorism

Mar
27
6:30 am06:30

International Studies Association

Title

Global Politics and the Fragility of Things

Sponsored By

Participants

Abstract and Keywords

William Connolly’s new book The Fragility of Things confronts International Relations with the increasing certainty that we live in a breakable world. Not unlike the realization of the nuclear peril that transformed our field in the 1950s, the formidable challenge of climate chaos and the violent tendencies of neoliberal economics confront the core competencies of the state and state system. The traditional tool box of international organizations and state action cannot be discounted but this roundtable seeks inspiration from Connolly’s newest work to think through globally significant tactics and resources necessary for maintaining a livable world. Attunement to creativity, the amplification of global solidarities and moral sentiments, militant democratic politics, and a cultivated attentiveness to cosmic and earthly complexity are all themes explored by this roundtable in an attempt to provoke a conversation on what can be done in the face of seemingly inevitable changes to our ecological order. In particular this discussion looks for resources for action that do not rely on the logics of security or markets that often dominate discussions of climate change. The roundtable is an opportunity for a conversation with a great thinker who has stepped up to the challenges of our contemporary condition.

Climate Change; Ecology; Ethics; Globalization; Governance

Mar
26
4:00 am04:00

International Studies Association

Title

The Geopolitics of New and Built Spaces/Places.

Sponsored By

  • Theme: Spaces and Places: Geopolitics in an Era of Globalization

Chairs and Discussants

Papers

Geopolitics of Cyberspace

The Geopolitics of the New Arctic

Weapons as Ethical Infrastructure: Terrains of Destruction as Desirable Spaces

Algorithmic Geopolitics

Abstract and Keywords

The geo of geopolitics is indebted to the expansion of Geography as a science in the 19th and early 20th century. Rudolf Kjellen’s coined the term geopolitics to capture that strategic relations between states were always contextual as military might was enabled and inhibited by location and resources. Detractors of the approach questioned the value of a research agenda so indebted to the seemingly inert features of the planet. However in the contemporary era the environment is anything but inert. The dynamic ecology of the earth is driven by its technological and built character as well as the amplifying effects of human induced climate change. Nature and artifice drive the complexities of global politics. Therefore, geopolitics has much to offer as its material-contextual approach requires the interaction of environmental changes in the analysis of politics. The distinction between changes by chance or changes by design is less important to geopolitics than whether the security environment is different. The papers on this panel engage the built and changing earth on these grounds. The internet, the disappearing Arctic, the global climate system, global weapons infrastructures, and security algorithms are all explored as fundamental changes that demand geopolitical thinking.

Climate Change; Geopolitics; Internet/Cyber/the Web; Artic Region/Antarctica; Space; Security